DRUM - Digital Repository at the University of Maryland

DRUM collects, preserves, and provides public access to the scholarly output of the university. Faculty and researchers can upload research products for rapid dissemination, global visibility and impact, and long-term preservation.

 
Submit to DRUM

Submit to DRUM

To submit an item to DRUM, login using your UMD credentials. Then select the "Submit Item to DRUM" link in the navigation bar. View DRUM policies and submission guidelines.
Equitable Access Policy

Equitable Access Policy

The University of Maryland Equitable Access Policy provides equitable, open access to the University's research and scholarship. Faculty can learn more about what is covered by the policy and how to deposit on the policy website.
Theses and Dissertations

Theses and Dissertations

DRUM includes all UMD theses and dissertations from 2003 forward.

Recent Submissions

Item
The World in an Oyster: The Architectural and Cultural Landscape of Canton's Canning Industry
(2024-05-21) Hutter, Christopher; Kern, Susan; Sprinkle, John
Canton, a neighborhood in southeast Baltimore listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is the former center of the food-canning industry that once dominated the economy in the city and in the state of Maryland. Canning was developed in France in the early 19th century and spread to America shortly thereafter, but it did not achieve widespread commercial success until the decades after the Civil War, when technical advancements made canning on an industrial scale possible. Baltimore canneries combined several natural features, including the Chesapeake Bay’s large oyster population and rich surrounding farmlands, with an influx of new immigrants from central and eastern Europe to create an industrial district that was the leading producer of canned foods in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Much as the canneries were designed architecturally to optimize their natural and commercial settings, the entire neighborhood of Canton came to be oriented, physically and socially, around the canneries, as a working-class neighborhood bound by ethnicity, language, religion, and occupation. Canning’s physical impact extended even beyond Baltimore to the Eastern Shore communities impacted by the increased demand for oysters, as sudden profits led to profound changes in the oystering industry that had long been the domain of rural watermen. Advances in technology like refrigeration and trucking largely obviated the need for Canton’s canneries in their designed form, and all of the firms along Boston Street closed down in the mid-20th century. Following a period of economic stagnation, redevelopment starting in the 1980s transformed Canton into a trendy, gentrified residential neighborhood by the turn of the century. Historic preservation had some success in retaining the area’s architectural fabric, but all of the former canneries have been demolished and largely replaced with apartment complexes and condominiums. The ways in which preservation handled, or perhaps failed to handle, this transition to modernity raise profound questions about the limits of preservation, especially in a maritime industrial context where the structures in question no longer support the prevailing economic impetus. Ultimately, new residents are drawn to Canton for both waterfront access and its historic associations, but when the forces that shaped the neighborhood have changed so dramatically, it is unclear what, exactly, has been preserved.
Item
First Baptist Church, Lakeland, Architectural and Historical Survey.
(2024) Adesina, Janet Ti-Oluwaleyi; Kern, Susan; Magalong, Michelle
Religion and education are key foundational elements in the establishment of the built environment of Lakeland, a historic African American community, located adjacent to the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland and in close proximity to the nation's capital, Washington DC. They make up paramount and essential elements to the history and culture of African American communities. This paper aims at providing a comprehensive architectural and historic survey report on the First Baptist Church of Lakeland, with the goal of preserving the remaining built environment’s cultural resources of the Lakeland community, facilitating efforts of restorative justice, and in developing a National Register of Historic Places nomination or a multiple property nomination, adding to the effort and great work already done by the Lakeland Community Heritage project. This study will use research and methodology from primary and secondary resources as well as 3D digital documentation to create a 3D model of the church. Digital documentation has proven vital in historically African American neighborhoods and the impact of urban renewal and segregation on the creation (and threat of demolition and neglect) of the built environment.
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National Register Nomination for Captain William Henry Burtis House, Annapolis, Maryland
(2024) Turner, II, Vincent P.; Kern, Susan; Magalong, Michelle
The Burtis House, at 69 Prince George Street Annapolis, Maryland, is located within the Annapolis Historic District and is the last waterman’s house directly on the city waterfront. Burtis House was constructed circa 1882 and its period of significance spans from ca. 1882 to 1910, the years William Burtis, the house’s original owner, resided there. The property has a Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties (MIHP) number, AA-1152, although the nomination form, which was written in 1983, contains only cursory information about the house. The form has no information about who William Burtis was, why Burtis or the house is significant, or even context about its location. Recent research illuminates the history of the Burtis family, Burtis House, and the working-class Annapolis neighborhood it was once a part of, known as Hell Point. This study examines the historical context of Burtis House to create a new understanding of the property, which will emphasize the importance of William Burtis in Annapolis’s history, tell the story of the Burtis family, reveal the largely forgotten history of Hell Point and nineteenth century Annapolis, and illustrate the significance of Burtis House’s survival to the present day.
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Social Networks and Fears of Stigma by Association with the LGBTQ+ Community
(2024) Guberman, Lucas; Lemay, Edward P. Jr.
Members of the LGBTQ+ community face unjust stigma and discrimination. People may not want to associate with members of this community due to fear that their association will cause them to be similarly stigmatized, termed fears of stigma by association. The purpose of the current research is to examine whether fears of stigma by association mediate the relationship between indirect contact and microaggressions towards members of the LGBTQ+ community. The results of this study point to reduced fears of stigma-by-association as a novel mechanism through which intergroup contact improves intergroup relations. However, there was no significant relationship found between fears of stigma by association and microaggressions. These results suggest people with inclusive social networks may be more accepting of the LGBTQ+ community because they are less fearful of being stigmatized by their network members.
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What does it mean to publish digital scholarship? (...and how do I do it?)
(2024-05-15) Wilson, Michelle
This presentation from the 2024 Library Publishing Forum provides a framework and set of questions for library publishers considering offering services to digital scholarship creators. Nested within the Digital Scholarship unit, Columbia University Libraries’ publishing program provides education, development support, and publishing services for a range of scholarly forms that have included, over the years, podcasts, digital exhibitions and editions, encyclopedic projects, maps, and other dynamic digital humanities projects. Through longstanding stewardship of this digital scholarship program, the Libraries have come to recognize a set of common challenges for novel forms of digital scholarship and the need to envision how these scholarly products will fit into current systems of dissemination, evaluation, and long-term storage. Through several case studies, this presentation outlines how a the menu of services was offered to digital scholarship project owners by the Columbia Libraries’ digital publishing program between 2018-2022 and the solutions that were developed to balance the need to support creativity and novelty in digital scholarship with concerns about sustainability and the ability for these projects to interact with existing systems for managing and promoting scholarship. When we think about preservation and publishing from the vantage-point of a Digital Scholarship department, which has traditionally been an incubator of “alternative” scholarly research outputs, we must consider both the research object as a whole (e.g., digital humanities project website), and as its parts (e.g., individual podcast episodes) and the vast variety of media and modes that digital scholarship may take. Any publishing tools and methods we employ must be flexible enough to recognize that DS projects require tailored solutions to help integrate them into the established publishing ecosystem built around digital but primarily text-based scholarship such as journals and monographs. This record also contains a worksheet/workbook to guide digital scholarship project owners and library publishers in designing publishing partnership agreements. The worksheet contains a sample MOU for such a partnership.