DRUM - Digital Repository at the University of Maryland

DRUM collects, preserves, and provides public access to the scholarly output of the university. Faculty and researchers can upload research products for rapid dissemination, global visibility and impact, and long-term preservation.

 
Submit to DRUM

Submit to DRUM

To submit an item to DRUM, login using your UMD credentials. Then select the "Submit Item to DRUM" link in the navigation bar. View DRUM policies and submission guidelines.
Equitable Access Policy

Equitable Access Policy

The University of Maryland Equitable Access Policy provides equitable, open access to the University's research and scholarship. Faculty can learn more about what is covered by the policy and how to deposit on the policy website.
Theses and Dissertations

Theses and Dissertations

DRUM includes all UMD theses and dissertations from 2003 forward.

Recent Submissions

Item
Optimization of an in-house bacterial cell-free expression system to evaluate the design of toehold switch sensors for selected cervical precancer miRNA biomarkers
(2024-07-17) Meyer, Jonathon; Zeidan, Quira; Spirito, Catherine
Cervical cancer is a significant health burden for women across the globe. However, over 94% of all cervical deaths occured in low and middle income countries (LMICs) in 2022 alone. This reflects a broader trend of a lack of access to quality treatment options for cervical cancer due to socioeconomic barriers including limited trained professionals, financial resources, and access to proper screening. We are partnering with UMaryland iGEM, an undergradutate-led synthetic biology research team, to assist in the development of a low-cost, point-of-care screening device for detecting commonly upregulated miRNAs in cervical precancer patients to address this issue. The functionality of this device relies on a cell-free expression kit, referred to as a lysate, in order to properly transcribe the desired toehold switches in the paper-based assay and translate the fluorescent protein output. However, common commercial cell-free lysates are expensive which increases the cost of producing our device – ultimately hindering its accessibility in LMICs. To address this problem, we propose a method for producing and optimizing our own in-house cell-free lysate. In our method, we compare three lysates – commercially available myTXTL, a lysate developed by the Aberdeen Proving Ground, and our own lysate – using varying ratios of energy mix, lysate, and T7p14 deGFP HP plasmid to evaluate the ideal composition of these components for a cell-free expression kit. We quantify these relationships using fluorescence in order to determine the efficacy of our lysate and the ideal ratio of components for a cell-free, paper-based assay
Item
30 Parent Number Input
(2024-07-15) Mix, Kelly; Cabrera, Natasha; not applicable
This dataset contains codes of parent numeracy input including number word utterances, other quantitative words, and quantitative actions or gestures based on a set of video recorded home visits conducted for a separate study (Cabrera & Reich, 2017) when children were 30 months old. The dataset also includes demographic information and children's scores on a numeracy outcome measure collected when children were 43 months on average. The parent number input codes were collected in 2022-2023 and the children’s numeracy outcome scores collected between 2020-2021.
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Exploring the Impact of Prenatal Drug Exposure on Brain Development: Data Collection Framework
(2024) Sare, Perfect; Jones, Morgan; Chi, Zehua; Riggins, Tracy
Understanding brain development is a critical area of neuroscience requiring comprehensive research. Numerous factors, including prenatal drug exposure (PDE), significantly influence both pre- and postnatal brain development. The HEALthy Brain and Child Development (HBCD) Study is a longitudinal study that aims to explore these impacts and advance our knowledge of early brain and child development. It utilizes multiple, carefully curated methods to obtain physiological data from participants, including diverse patient recruitment, biospecimen collection, and various MRI scans. This poster will address these methods of data collection and how they will contribute to future research. 2
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Enhanced Computational Tool for Seismic Fault Sensitivity Screening
(2024) Subramaniyan, Vishnu; Mandhan, Sai; Maheshwari, Raunak; Bensi, Michelle; Lundstern, Jens-Erik
Earthquakes occur when stress exceeds the strength of pre-existing faults, potentially causing severe damage to the built environment. It is critical to identify the faults that are most likely to rupture, given our knowledge of various subsurface properties. Existing fault screening tools are closed-source or have limitations that affect their usefulness in research and engineering applications. Our team is developing a more efficient, open-source seismic fault sensitivity screening software program designed to support probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and geophysical research. Our research aims to improve upon existing tools by leveraging vectorization to increase calculation speeds and offering choice among multiple probabilistic distributions to capture uncertainty in input parameters. Moreover, the open-source nature of this tool enables researchers to adapt the program for their own purposes to support seismic hazard assessment.
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BioCascade Exhaled Breath Sampler (BEBS): Sample Viability
(2024) Chartrand, Ansley; Coleman, Kristen
The viability of samples collected in the BioCasade Exhaled Breath Sampler (BEBS) machine is to be measured by simulating an exhaled breath sampling event via a Collison nebulizer. There are four stages the nebulized stimulants are divided into within the BEBS system, they divide the particles based on size. The stages are labeled large, medium, small, and BioSpot and they collect particles of sizes >8.2µm, 3.3-8.2µm, 1.15-3.3µm, and <1.15µm respectively. Similar experiments have been done to examine the viability of collected samples in the BEBS system but all are done at lower collection flow rates, where this test collects at 12 lpm. In addition, this experiment collects the nebulized virus onto a hydrogel surface as opposed to previously used liquid mediums. PR8 virus will be used as the model to simulate the collection of influenza viruses. The purpose of this experiment is to recreate real-world collection data to ensure the BEBS efficacy for collecting culturable samples prior to clinical use in the EMIT-2 study.