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Effective Iterative Techniques for Fingerprinting Design IP

dc.contributor.authorCaldwell, Andrew E.
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Hyun-Jin
dc.contributor.authorKahng, Andrew B.
dc.contributor.authorMantik, Stefanus
dc.contributor.authorPotkonjak, Miodrag
dc.contributor.authorQu, Gang
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jennifer L.
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-12T12:43:35Z
dc.date.available2009-03-12T12:43:35Z
dc.date.issued2004-01
dc.identifier.citationA.E. Caldwell, H. Choi, A.B. Kahng, S. Mantik, M. Potkonjak, G. Qu, and J.L. Wong.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/8956
dc.description.abstractFingerprinting is an approach that assigns a unique and invisible ID to each sold instance of the intellectual property (IP). One of the key advantages fingerprinting-based intellectual property protection (IPP) has over watermarking-based IPP is the enabling of tracing stolen hardware or software. Fingerprinting schemes have been widely and effectively used to achieve this goal; however, their application domain has been restricted only to static artifacts, such as image and audio, where distinct copies can be obtained easily. In this paper, we propose the first generic fingerprinting technique that can be applied to an arbitrary synthesis (optimization or decision) or compilation problem and, therefore to hardware and software IPs. The key problem with design IP fingerprinting is that there is a need to generate a large number of structurally unique but functionally and timing identical designs. To reduce the cost of generating such distinct copies, we apply iterative optimization in an incremental fashion to solve a fingerprinted instance. Therefore, we leverage on the optimization effort already spent in obtaining previous solutions, yet we generate a uniquely fingerprinted new solution. This generic approach is the basis for developing specific fingerprinting techniques for four important problems in VLSI CAD: partitioning, graph coloring, satisfiability, and standard-cell placement. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the new fingerprinting-based IPP techniques on a number of standard benchmarks.en
dc.format.extent425474 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherIEEEen
dc.subjectFingerprinten
dc.subjectIntellectual property protectionen
dc.subjectiterative optimizationen
dc.subjectVLSIen
dc.subjectwatermarken
dc.titleEffective Iterative Techniques for Fingerprinting Design IPen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtA. James Clark School of Engineeringen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us
dc.rights.licenseCopyright © 2004 IEEE. Reprinted from IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems. This material is posted here with permission of the IEEE. Such permission of the IEEE does not in any way imply IEEE endorsement of any of the University of Maryland's products or services. Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution must be obtained from the IEEE by writing to pubs-permissions@ieee.org. By choosing to view this document, you agree to all provisions of the copyright laws protecting it.


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