Exposure to extreme heat and precipitation events associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland, U.S.A.

dc.contributor.authorSoneja, Sutyajeet
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Chengsheng
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Jared
dc.contributor.authorUpperman, Crystal Romeo
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Clifford
dc.contributor.authorSapkota, Amir
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T15:54:39Z
dc.date.available2021-07-28T15:54:39Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-27
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies have investigated the association between asthma exacerbations and exposures to ambient temperature and precipitation. However, limited data exists regarding how extreme events, projected to grow in frequency, intensity, and duration in the future in response to our changing climate, will impact the risk of hospitalization for asthma. The objective of our study was to quantify the association between frequency of extreme heat and precipitation events and increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland between 2000 and 2012. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to examine the association between exposure to extreme heat and precipitation events and risk of hospitalization for asthma (ICD-9 code 493, n = 115,923). Occurrence of extreme heat events in Maryland increased the risk of same day hospitalization for asthma (lag 0) by 3 % (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.03, 95 % Confidence Interval (CI): 1.00, 1.07), with a considerably higher risk observed for extreme heat events that occur during summer months (OR: 1.23, 95 % CI: 1.15, 1.33). Likewise, summertime extreme precipitation events increased the risk of hospitalization for asthma by 11 % in Maryland (OR: 1.11, 95 % CI: 1.06, 1.17). Across age groups, increase in risk for asthma hospitalization from exposure to extreme heat event during the summer months was most pronounced among youth and adults, while those related to extreme precipitation event was highest among ≤4 year olds. Exposure to extreme heat and extreme precipitation events, particularly during summertime, is associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland. Our results suggest that projected increases in frequency of extreme heat and precipitation event will have significant impact on public health.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12940-016-0142-z
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/iqiw-mxce
dc.identifier.citationSoneja, S., Jiang, C., Fisher, J. et al. Exposure to extreme heat and precipitation events associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland, U.S.A.. Environ Health 15, 57 (2016).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/27586
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtSchool of Public Health
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMaryland Institute of Applied Environmental Health
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)
dc.subjectAsthmaen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectExtreme weatheren_US
dc.subjectHeaten_US
dc.subjectHospitalizationen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitationen_US
dc.subjectRespiratory illnessen_US
dc.titleExposure to extreme heat and precipitation events associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland, U.S.A.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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