Impact of early, weekly drinking on latent classes of alcohol involvement progression and recovery: Evidence from the NESARC Waves 1 and 2.

dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kerry M.
dc.contributor.authorReboussin, Beth A.
dc.contributor.authorStorr, Carla L.
dc.contributor.authorMojtabai, Ramin
dc.contributor.authorSusukida, Ryoko
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Andrea S.
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Bernadette A.
dc.contributor.authorLuken, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorAmin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-07T19:42:37Z
dc.date.available2023-09-07T19:42:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-26
dc.descriptionPartial funding for Open Access provided by the UMD Libraries' Open Access Publishing Fund.
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Early drinkers have been found to have higher risk of developing alcohol use disorder; however, the association of early drinking with progression to problematic alcohol involvement that does not meet disorder criteria (i.e., subclinical problems) or to severe stages of alcohol involvement, sex-specific associations, and relationship of early drinking with alcohol recovery have rarely been investigated. Methods: Using data from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we applied latent transition analyses to investigate the impact of weekly drinking before age 18 on alcohol progression and recovery operationalized as three classes of alcohol involvement using abuse and dependence indicators. We analyzed data separately for male (n = 12,276) and female (n = 14,750) drinkers and applied propensity score methods to address confounding. Results: We observed significant associations between early, weekly drinking and alcohol involvement class membership at Wave 1 for both males and females. For males, early, weekly drinking was also associated with greater odds of transitioning from moderate to severe alcohol problems (aOR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.72, 5.35). For females, early, weekly drinking predicted the transition from no to severe problems (aOR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.11–8.00). Contrary to our hypothesis, early, weekly drinking was associated with greater likelihood of transition from severe to no problems for males (aOR = 3.23, 95% CI = 1.26, 8.26). Discussion: Frequent, early drinking seems to be an important indicator of drinking progression with differential associations by sex. This information is useful to identify those at greater risk of progressing to severe drinking problems to intervene appropriately.
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.abrep.2022.100410
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/dspace/bmss-tmct
dc.identifier.citationGreen KM, Reboussin BA, Storr CL, Mojtabai R, Susukida R, Young AS, Cullen BA, Luken A, Amin-Esmaeili M, Crum RM. Impact of early, weekly drinking on latent classes of alcohol involvement progression and recovery: Evidence from the NESARC Waves 1 and 2. Addict Behav Rep. 2022 Jan 26;15:100410.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/30434
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.isAvailableAtSchool of Public Healthen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtPublic & Community Healthen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us
dc.subjectage of onset
dc.subjectalcohol use disorder
dc.subjectlatent transition analyses
dc.subjectsex differences
dc.subjectpopulation-based data
dc.titleImpact of early, weekly drinking on latent classes of alcohol involvement progression and recovery: Evidence from the NESARC Waves 1 and 2.
dc.typeArticle
local.equitableAccessSubmissionNo

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