Determinants of Communal Strength: The Effects of the Other's Likeability and of Benefiting the Other

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2006-12-04

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This research investigated potential determinants of communal strength. Communal strength refers to the degree of motivation to respond to a communal partner's needs. It was hypothesized that increased liking for the other and giving a benefit to the other would each increase communal strength toward the other. Female participants completed pretest and posttest measures of communal strength toward another female student. Participants heard an audiotape that made the other sound likable or unlikable and in need of advice or not in need of advice. The participants gave advice to the other or observed someone else giving advice to the other. The results of an analysis of covariance of the posttest measure of communal strength, controlling for the pretest measure of communal strength, revealed support for both hypotheses. Communal strength toward the other increased when the other was likable, and when the person gave a benefit to the other.

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