THE RELATIONSHIP OF SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND RELIGIOUS FAITH AFFILIATION TO BLACK STUDENT RETENTION AT A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTION

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Date
2004-07-06
Authors
Holmes, Ryan Clevis
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Stewart, Greig M
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Abstract
This study was conducted to examine the relationships, if any, between socioeconomic status (SES), religious faith affiliation, and retention of Black students in a predominantly White institution. The 2002 University New Student Census, a questionnaire given to all students during summer orientation, was used to secure a sample of Black students. Students who selected the "Black, African American, Negro" option ONLY were considered for the study. Socioeconomic Status was separated into three groups: Father's level of education; Mother's level of education; and total parental income. A student was considered retained if they returned for the Fall 2003 semester. Also, participants' religious preference was self-reported using the choices offered in the survey. The study used chi-square analyses, because the nature of the data is categorical. The data suggest that there were no statistically significant findings using SES, religious faith affiliation, and retention; yet there were trends that further research could explain.
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