Show simple item record

Maximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumes

dc.contributor.authorLausted, Christopher G
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Arthur T
dc.contributor.authorScott, William H
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Monique M
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Karen M
dc.contributor.authorCoursey, Derya C
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-09T14:59:13Z
dc.date.available2021-12-09T14:59:13Z
dc.date.issued2006-05-05
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/vmfj-3pbj
dc.identifier.citationLausted, C.G., Johnson, A.T., Scott, W.H. et al. Maximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumes. BioMed Eng OnLine 5, 29 (2006).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/28221
dc.description.abstractMaximum pressures developed by the respiratory muscles can indicate the health of the respiratory system, help to determine maximum respiratory flow rates, and contribute to respiratory power development. Past measurements of maximum pressures have been found to be inadequate for inclusion in some exercise models involving respiration. Maximum inspiratory and expiratory airway pressures were measured over a range of lung volumes in 29 female and 19 male adults. A commercial bell spirometry system was programmed to occlude airflow at nine target lung volumes ranging from 10% to 90% of vital capacity. In women, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 39 to 61 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 66 to 28 cmH2O. In men, maximum expiratory pressure increased with volume from 63 to 97 cmH2O and maximum inspiratory pressure decreased with volume from 97 to 39 cmH2O. Equations describing pressures for both sexes are: Pe/Pmax = 0.1426 Ln( %VC) + 0.3402 R2 = 0.95 Pi/Pmax = 0.234 Ln(100 - %VC) - 0.0828 R2 = 0.96 These results were found to be consistent with values and trends obtained by other authors. Regression equations may be suitable for respiratory mechanics models.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/1475-925X-5-29
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.subjectLung Volumeen_US
dc.subjectVital Capacityen_US
dc.subjectMaximum Pressureen_US
dc.subjectRespiratory Muscleen_US
dc.subjectFunctional Residual Capacityen_US
dc.titleMaximum static inspiratory and expiratory pressures with different lung volumesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtA. James Clark School of Engineeringen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtFischell Department of Bioengineeringen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record