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dc.contributor.advisorStangor, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorleary, scott paulen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-02-02T06:45:14Z
dc.date.available2005-02-02T06:45:14Z
dc.date.issued2004-12-02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/2099
dc.description.abstractAlthough people use stereotypes and prejudices to arrive at preferred conclusions, individual differences determine the extent and direction to which these intergroup attitudes color judgments. Research demonstrates that numerous personality variables act as predictors of the use of stereotypes and prejudice. Some attempts have been made to organize these measures into underlying values systems. I tested the hypotheses that values influence perceptions of ingroups and outgroups. In Study 1, participants completed individual difference measures. Factor analysis revealed two independent factors: Egalitarianism, which predicted positive judgments of outgroups, and Conservatism, which predicted positive judgments of ingroups. In Study 2, participants read a story describing either a gay or heterosexual man. I predicted that participants would vary their interpretation of the target based on their value orientations. Although Egalitarianism and Conservatism did not predict ratings of the target individual, they did predict free responses of the target, homophobia, and behaviors.en_US
dc.format.extent481540 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleValues as Guiding Principles of Motivation: A Two Factor Modelen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychology, Socialen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledvaluesen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledmotivationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledattitudesen_US


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