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COLLEGE STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD SEEKING PROFESSIONAL HELP: THE ROLE OF SOCIAL CLASS, CLASSISM, AND STIGMA

dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Matthew J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Na-Yeunen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-08T05:35:27Z
dc.date.available2016-09-08T05:35:27Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2B80H
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/18717
dc.description.abstractResearch on attitudes toward seeking professional help among college students has examined the influence of social class and stigma. This study tested 4 theoretically and empirically derived structural equation models of college students’ attitudes toward seeking counseling with a sample of 2230 incoming university students. The models represented competing hypotheses regarding the manners in which objective social class, subjective social class, classism, public stigma, stigma by close others, and self-stigma related to attitudes toward seeking professional help. Findings supported the social class direct and indirect effects model, as well as the notion that classism and stigma domains could explain the indirect relationships between social class and attitudes. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for counseling are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCOLLEGE STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD SEEKING PROFESSIONAL HELP: THE ROLE OF SOCIAL CLASS, CLASSISM, AND STIGMAen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCounseling and Personnel Servicesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCounseling psychologyen_US


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