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INVESTIGATING HOW INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL INTERNAL SOCIAL NETWORKS CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMUNICATION OF SYSTEMIC INITIATIVES IN A LARGE URBAN SCHOOL DISTRICT

dc.contributor.advisorMcLaughlin, Margaret J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKochanowski, Melissa Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-06T06:38:12Z
dc.date.available2016-02-06T06:38:12Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2M13Q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/17264
dc.description.abstractImplementation of initiatives and mandates in schools and districts has increased over the last decade and districts are constantly tasked with disseminating new information to staff in the schools. Recently studies have been conducted in the field of education using Social Network Analysis (SNA) to explore how information and knowledge flow between people in schools and districts in order to identify key disseminators, brokers, and hinders of information, as well as the overall patterns of communication. The purpose of this study was to examine the informal communication networks and key actors used to disseminate information about the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in four elementary schools in a large urban school district. The study was based on the premise that obtaining a better understanding of the informal communication pathways in these schools would allow school and district leaders to better understand how information flows throughout schools and to determine whether the positions intended to communicate new information in a school were actually being used. This exploratory study used an online survey and SNA to identify the flow of and key actors for communication around two initiatives, CCSS and Data Wise. The findings suggest that each of the four schools had highly centralized networks where only a few key staff members were integral for sharing information about initiatives. The key people in each school tended to be administrators and individuals who held two positions. One of the key positions in each school was the Professional Development Lead Teacher (PDLT), which is the position the District had created to ensure information about key initiatives was disseminated.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINVESTIGATING HOW INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL INTERNAL SOCIAL NETWORKS CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMUNICATION OF SYSTEMIC INITIATIVES IN A LARGE URBAN SCHOOL DISTRICTen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducation Policy, and Leadershipen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEducationen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledchangeen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledCommon Core State Standardsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledcommunicationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolleddisseminationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledinitiativeen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSocial Network Analysisen_US


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