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Racial Differences in the Propensity to Negotiate

dc.contributor.advisorGelfand, Michele Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrosby, Brandon John Richburgen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-06T06:30:41Z
dc.date.available2016-02-06T06:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M24B0B
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/17198
dc.description.abstractThis research set out to examine the potential impact of race on the willingness to negotiate in the workplace. Drawing on previous research on gender influences on the willingness to negotiate and research on race and workplace discrimination, it was predicted that Black employees would be less willing to negotiate as compared to Whites, yet that this relationship would be moderated by a positive climate for diversity. Findings from interview data and a survey with employed participants showed that Black participants were less likely to negotiate on various topics such as promotions, bonuses and stock options. The ambiguity of these topics as well as climate for diversity were investigated further in a lab experiment designed to manipulate organizational factors that could impact one’s willingness to negotiate. The manipulation for the ambiguous condition, climate for diversity nor the race of the participant impacted negotiation rates. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRacial Differences in the Propensity to Negotiateen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledDiversityen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledGenderen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledNegotiationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRaceen_US


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