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School Counselors' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Involvement Concerning Gifted and Talented Students

dc.contributor.advisorHolcomb-McCoy, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlson, Nancy Naomien_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-07-16T05:17:14Z
dc.date.available2004-07-16T05:17:14Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-21en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/1674
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore school counselors' knowledge and perceptions of gifted and talented students, and to investigate whether these variables influenced their involvement with such students. The following questions were examined: 1) What are the multiple dimensions underlying school counselors' knowledge and perceptions of, and involvement with gifted and talented students? 2) What is the relationship between school counselors' knowledge of gifted and talented students and their involvement with such students? 3) What is the relationship between school counselors' perceptions of gifted and talented students and their involvement with such students? 4) Do school counselors' knowledge, perceptions, and involvement concerning gifted and talented students differ significantly across demographic variables? In order to answer these questions, a survey instrument was developed based on an extensive review of the professional literature. Of the approximately 650 surveys mailed to names randomly selected from the American School Counselor Association's membership, 320 were returned and usable ( a 48.9% return rate). Using principal components analysis with varimax rotation, two dimensions were identified underlying the construct of knowledge, nine dimensions were identified underlying the construct of perspectives, and three dimensions were identified underlying the construct of involvement, one of which was "advocacy." Results indicated that general GT knowledge seemed to predict all three dimensions of school counselors' reported involvement with gifted and talented students, and that identification knowledge significantly predicted advocacy. Limited predictive value of perceptions for involvement was found. Other findings indicated the following statistically significant differences: 1) more experienced counselors reported more knowledge of and involvement with gifted and talented students than those with less experience; 2) high school counselors tended to report less involvement than middle school or elementary school counselors; 3) counselors who worked in schools with over 50% of the students receiving free or reduced lunch reported less involvement than did counselors working in schools with a lower percentage of students receiving free and reduced lunch, and 4) counselors working in schools with a GT program and/ or a GT specialist reported more knowledge and involvement than counselors working without such a program or specialist. This study has training and practice implications for school counselors.en_US
dc.format.extent1726812 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleSchool Counselors' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Involvement Concerning Gifted and Talented Studentsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCounseling and Personnel Servicesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEducation, Guidance and Counselingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSchool counselorsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledGifted and talented studentsen_US


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