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AN EMERGING GROUNDED THEORY OF FACULTY HIRING PROCESSES IN UNIONIZED COMPREHENSIVE UNIVERSITIES

dc.contributor.advisorO'Meara, KerryAnnen_US
dc.contributor.authorLounder, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-26T05:32:38Z
dc.date.available2015-06-26T05:32:38Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2SG91
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/16590
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT Title of dissertation: AN EMERGING GROUNDED THEORY OF FACULTY HIRING PROCESSES IN UNIONIZED COMPREHENSIVE UNIVERSITIES Andrew D. Lounder, Doctor of Philosophy, 2015 Dissertation directed by: Professor KerryAnn O'Meara Department of Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education Growth in part-time faculty workforces in U.S. higher education since 1970 has been remarkable. Part-time faculty growth as a percentage of the whole has occurred most rapidly in comprehensive universities in recent years and carries with it important implications for student instruction. Comprehensive universities are of critical importance to the realization of higher levels of educational attainment by underserved and nontraditional college populations. The purpose of this study is to understand instructional faculty hiring processes in comprehensive universities. The study is derived from an application of grounded theory research methods within and across three university settings. Analysis shows administrators at all levels of the organizational chart (i.e., department chair, dean, and provost) follow a cycle of activities that results in both direct and indirect (or systemic), outcomes in faculty hiring. First, they scan the environments in which they are situated for possible risks to their work including faculty hiring. Second, they perceive risks, including risks of opportunity, from their own viewpoints. Third, and of central importance, they assert decision role changes in response to the risks they perceive. That is, they take action. Finally, they establish ownership of new decision responsibility. A visual model depicting the grounded theory is shared. Findings position faculty hiring as an outcome of rule following decisions and risk response rather than rational choice. Part-time faculty hiring is found to function as an organizational release valve, which circumvents role tension of the sort experienced among department, college, and university administrators in full-time faculty hiring. Implications for university-level faculty hiring policy and practice, as well as for future research, are discussed. One conclusion is that university decision makers should be more strategic about faculty hiring by aligning the process with desired outcomes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAN EMERGING GROUNDED THEORY OF FACULTY HIRING PROCESSES IN UNIONIZED COMPREHENSIVE UNIVERSITIESen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducation Policy, and Leadershipen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledHigher educationen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledOrganizational behavioren_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledOrganization theoryen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAdministrationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledFacultyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledGrounded Theoryen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledHiringen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledUniversityen_US


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