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dc.contributor.advisorSullivan, Joseph H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Alexandra Oliviaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-06T11:18:01Z
dc.date.available2012-07-06T11:18:01Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/12536
dc.description.abstractWashington, D.C. has experienced a substantial decline in tree canopy cover during the latter half of the 20th century. Casey Trees, a local non-profit organization, was established with the purpose of stabilizing D.C.'s urban forest. Over 10,000 trees have been planted; however, little is known about the condition or benefits associated with these trees. In order to enhance the sustainability of Casey Trees' planting program, I established baseline rates of condition and mortality and created a set of management recommendations based on numerous pre-planting, environmental and socioeconomic variables. Tree mortality was found to be high, with 24-34% of trees not surviving the first few years of growth. Nursery, planting time, landuse, space type, jurisdiction and numerous socioeconomic variables had a significant effect on tree survival. This study suggests that active programmatic decisions can be made to help reduce new tree mortality and ultimately enhance the long-term production of urban tree-based benefits.en_US
dc.titleSUSTAINABILITY OF AN URBAN TREE PLANTING GROUP: ASSESSING THE CONDITION AND BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH RECENTLY PLANTED TREES IN WASHINGTON, D.C.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science and Landscape Architecture (PLSA)en_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledUrban forestryen_US


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