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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Sunminen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCarter-Pokras, Olivia Den_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Luen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-06T06:00:01Z
dc.date.available2011-07-06T06:00:01Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11565
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the relationship between acculturation and BMI among Asian Americans. Methods: Data of 847 Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese recruited for a health education program in Maryland were included. Acculturation was measured by the short version of Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale (SL-ASIA) and its individual components. Height and weight were measured by trained staff. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate the parameters of acculturation variables. Results: After adjusting for confounders, SL-ASIA (β=0.71, 95% CI: 0.15, 1.26), having education in the U.S (β=0.56, 95% CI: 0.01, 1.11), younger age of arrival (0-5 years: β=3.32, 95% CI: 1.84, 4.80, 6-10 years: β=1.55, 95% CI: 0.02, 3.07) and equal preference of Asian/American food in restaurants (β=0.92, 95% CI 0.38, 1.46) were associated with BMI. The association between acculturation and BMI was stronger among men than women, and weakest among Vietnamese. Conclusion: Acculturation is moderately associated with BMI among Asian Americans.en_US
dc.titleAcculturation and BMI among Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese Adults in Marylanden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEpidemiology and Biostatisticsen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAcculturationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAsian Americansen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledBMIen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledObesityen_US


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