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dc.contributor.advisorLejuez, Carl Wen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaughters, Stacey Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Jessica Margareten_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-06T05:46:41Z
dc.date.available2011-07-06T05:46:41Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11492
dc.description.abstractDue to the high prevalence of illicit drug use and subsequent costs to society, researchers have focused on potential mechanisms underlying continued substance use and dependence. One mechanism of interest is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its primary hormone, cortisol. Chronic substance use is associated with elevated basal cortisol concentrations and a blunted cortisol response to stress which has been shown to predict substance use outcomes. However, little is known about the specific conditions under which drug users display a dysregulated cortisol response to stress. Therefore, the current study compared HPA axis response to two different psychological stressors among a sample of cocaine dependent individuals. Results indicated no significant differences in cortisol response across conditions. Future researchers should conduct larger scale studies with carefully matched healthy non-drug using participants to determine whether the absence of a significant stress effect on cortisol functioning is specific to chronic cocaine use.en_US
dc.titleHPA axis reactivity to psychological stress among cocaine dependent individualsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychobiologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledcocaineen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledcortisolen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledHPA axisen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledstressen_US


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