Equal Living

dc.contributor.advisorSimon, Madlenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCain, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-28T05:30:14Z
dc.date.available2021-09-28T05:30:14Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.description.abstractDesigning with everyone in mind is a phenomenon that is talked about often but is either hit or missed when executed. When it comes to the blind and visually impaired, sensitivity in design needs to be heightened. Factors such as limited access to activities and information, societal stigmas and lack of employment, frequently lead blind and low vision individuals to isolation. The major sensory organ of a person is their eyes and with only this sense one can identify with, and maneuver the information in the environment. The amount of readable material in public spaces that are accessible are often limited to restroom signs, ATM’s and phone booths, while signs that may lead you to these same places ironically are not. Through this thesis, the inaccessible built and physical environment will be brought to light, and new tactics and design methods will be established in order to help those with vision impairments regain their independence in societyen_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/zeed-3rig
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/28029
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledArchitectureen_US
dc.titleEqual Livingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

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