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dc.contributor.authorDe Los Reyes, Andres
dc.contributor.authorKazdin, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-29T14:50:00Z
dc.date.available2008-08-29T14:50:00Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationDe Los Reyes, A, Kazdin, AE (2008) When the evidence says, "Yes, no, and maybe so": Attending to and interpreting inconsistent findings among evidence-based interventions, Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17 (1), 47-51.en
dc.identifier.issn1467-8721
dc.identifier.issn0963-7214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/8394
dc.description.abstractAn international, multidisciplinary effort aims to identify evidence-based treatments (EBTs) or interventions. The goal of this effort is to identify specific techniques or programs that successfully target and change specific behaviors. In clinical psychology, EBTs are identified based on the outcomes of randomized controlled trials examining whether treatments outperform control or alternative treatment conditions. Treatment outcomes are measured in multiple ways. Consistently, different ways of gauging outcomes yield inconsistent conclusions. Historically, EBT research has not accounted for these inconsistencies. In this paper we highlight the implications of inconsistencies, describe a framework for redressing inconsistent findings, and illustrate how the framework can guide future research on how to administer and combine treatments to maximize treatment effects and how to study treatments via quantitative review.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported, in part, by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Grant MH67540 (Andres De Los Reyes) and by NIMH Grant MH59029 (Alan E. Kazdin).en
dc.format.extent70055 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUnited Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd..en
dc.subjectefficacyen
dc.subjecteffectivenessen
dc.subjectinterventionen
dc.subjectrange of possible changesen
dc.subjecttreatmenten
dc.titleWhen the evidence says, "Yes, no, and maybe so": Attending to and interpreting inconsistent findings among evidence-based interventions.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCollege of Behavioral & Social Sciencesen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtPsychologyen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us


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