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GRAPH THEORETIC CONNECTIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION OF THE UNITED STATES

dc.contributor.advisorNeel, Maile Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Joseph Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-02-04T08:00:58Z
dc.date.available2006-02-04T08:00:58Z
dc.date.issued2005-12-13en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/3265
dc.description.abstractConnectivity is critical for persistence of species in the face of anthropogenic habitat destruction and fragmentation. Graph theory is a relatively new method for quantifying connectivity that has tremendous potential, but landscape graph applications to date are limited to specific conservation situations with static proportions of habitat (P). This study provides a uniform evaluation of graph metrics across wide gradients in P in both random neutral landscapes and real, forested landscapes from the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Such an analysis provides a background that will be valuable for future interpretation of graph metrics. Results indicate that graph metrics have characteristic forms when plotted against P that can be exploited for conservation management.en_US
dc.format.extent1415551 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleGRAPH THEORETIC CONNECTIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION OF THE UNITED STATESen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science and Landscape Architecture (PSLA)en_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledBiology, Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledconnectivityen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledlandscapeen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledfragmentationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledgraph theoryen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledMid-Atlanticen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledpercolationen_US


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