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THE CONTRASTING EFFECTS OF SOCIAL CAPITAL ON NONVIOLENT RESISTANCE: EVIDENCE FROM PERU

dc.contributor.advisorBirnir, Johannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCORONADO-CASTELLANOS, PAVELen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-12T05:31:07Z
dc.date.available2020-10-12T05:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/mhem-xfq9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/26656
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation develops a model to understand the joint role of social capital and nonviolent resistance campaigns to obtain concessions and changes in public goods provision in new democracies and in democracies with weak party systems. The factors that explain variation in effectiveness among nonviolent campaigns have been understudied. By adding social capital to the analysis, this dissertation contributes to filling this theoretical and empirical void. I use data from Perú to provide empirical support to my theory. In Chapter 2, a micro-level theory of nonviolent campaigns is developed. This theory argues that by making cooperation easier, social capital increases the levels of participation in nonviolent campaigns, thereby making concessions more likely. A novel result of this theory is that it shows that social capital is a key feature of social life that can help to generate disruptive collective actions but also to prevent the use of such disruptive means. Thus, under some circumstances, social capital can help to reduce the observed disruptive actions. Chapters 3 and 4 test the theoretical propositions derived in Chapter 2 using Peruvian data. Chapter 3 finds that social capital has a negative statistically significant effect on some types of nonviolent campaigns but positive effects on other types of nonviolent campaigns. Chapter 3 also provides evidence that peasant communities’ organizations in the first half of the 20th century were product of persistence effects of early colonial extractive institutions (i.e. the mining mita) with colonial revolts as important channels of persistence. Chapter 4 shows that nonviolent campaigns and social capital form a positive interactive relationship to affect the provision of public goods at the local level. Social capital makes more likely nonviolent campaign’s success. Chapter 5 summarizes the main conclusions of this dissertation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE CONTRASTING EFFECTS OF SOCIAL CAPITAL ON NONVIOLENT RESISTANCE: EVIDENCE FROM PERUen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGovernment and Politicsen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEconomic theoryen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledConflicten_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledLocal Politicsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledNon Violent Resistanceen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledPublic Goodsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRevenue Windfallsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSocial Capitalen_US


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