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BRITTLE FAULTING IN POROUS, WATER-SATURATED SANDSTONE DEFORMED UNDER HIGH PORE FLUID PRESSURE

dc.contributor.advisorZhu, Wenluen_US
dc.contributor.authorZega, Zacharyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-24T05:32:18Z
dc.date.available2020-09-24T05:32:18Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/teey-did3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/26402
dc.description.abstractThe effective stress law is widely used to model the deformation of crustal rock. It states that effective pressure, the difference between confining pressure and pore fluid pressure, dictates rock strength. In low-porosity rock, previous work has shown that the stability of faulting is controlled by the magnitude of pore fluid pressure rather than the effective pressure. To understand the effect of pore fluid pressure on porous rocks, I deformed water-saturated samples of Darley Dale Sandstone (~13-15% initial porosity) at strain rates from 10-4 to 10-6 s-1 while using a constant effective pressure of 10 MPa and pore fluid pressures ranging from 2 to 180 MPa. The results show that the shear strength is well-predicted by the effective stress law, but fault growth at Pf = 180 MPa resulted in pervasive grain comminution and stabilized fault propagation compared to all other lower pressure experiments.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBRITTLE FAULTING IN POROUS, WATER-SATURATED SANDSTONE DEFORMED UNDER HIGH PORE FLUID PRESSUREen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledGeophysicsen_US


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