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dc.contributor.advisorOlson, Keith Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorHostetter, Christinaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-31T20:18:29Z
dc.date.available2004-05-31T20:18:29Z
dc.date.issued2004-04-29en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/235
dc.description.abstractIn 1927, Hershey Chocolate Corporation and Coca-Cola struck up a business relationship based on sugar sales. Hershey Corporation supplied Coca-Cola and Hershey Chocolate Corporation with sugar through a common broker. During World War II, companies such as Hershey and Coca-Cola faced severe sugar shortages that could potentially ruin their companies. Both companies used their ability to influence government policies in order to receive the goods they needed to maintain production levels while increasing profits. Through their corporate connections and strong lobbying efforts, Coca-Cola and Hershey used the government's willingness to write contracts to ensure that they did not suffer a loss in profits or lower production levels due to the war. This government aid provided both companies with a chance to expand on a global scale in the post-war years. Coca-Cola took advantage of the opportunity by expanding worldwide, while Hershey chose to expand within the domestic market.en_US
dc.format.extent1124079 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleSugar Allies: How Hershey and Coca-Cola Used Government Contracts and Sugar Exemptions to Elude Sugar Rationing Regulationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistory/Library & Information Systemsen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledHistory, United Statesen_US


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