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dc.contributor.advisorTikekar, Rohan Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorSherman-Wood, Robert Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T05:36:23Z
dc.date.available2019-06-19T05:36:23Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/k0bj-oqlo
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/21908
dc.description.abstractThe process of making meat kosher, or “kashering,” involves soaking the meat, covering it in salt for at least one hour, and several rinses after. This study evaluates the effect this process has on the survivability and thermal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport on fresh chicken and beef, as well as the effect on quality and acceptability of both meats. The process yielded a minor reduction of both pathogens at ~1 log CFU/g. Surviving Salmonella from kashered chicken displayed an increase in thermal resistance (p<0.05). A sensory analysis panel rated salted chicken and beef higher quality and saltier than not kosher meat (p<0.05). The kashering process did change the color of both meats (p<0.05), attributable to the significant increase in salt content of the meats (p<0.05), but did not affect the texture of the meat (p>0.05).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffect of the kashering process on the safety and quality of meaten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentFood Scienceen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledFood scienceen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledKosheren_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledMeaten_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSalten_US


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