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dc.contributor.advisorSoltan, Karolen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTismaneanu, Vladimiren_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Mary Kateen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-12T05:56:26Z
dc.date.available2018-09-12T05:56:26Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2BC3T140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/21282
dc.description.abstractIn 1995, the Dayton Peace Agreement (DPA) ended the Bosnian War, a conflict fought along ethnic lines that claimed nearly 100,000 lives. The DPA created a new Bosnian government based on a power-sharing model that allocates political power according to the ethnic composition of the population. Although this arrangement has preserved an uneasy peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH), it has also produced a political system in which ethnic politics prevail and social divisions are institutionally reinforced, particularly at the local level. Since 1995, institutions such as education have trended toward ‘separate but equal’ models. I argue that this poses a threat to the reconciliation process in BiH. Therefore, the question that this dissertation seeks to address is: what is the effect of ethnically divided education on the post-war generation of Bosnians? To answer this question, the dissertation traces the relationship between the extreme consociationalism first articulated at Dayton and the Bosnian education system, in which 14 education ministries—appointed through an entrenched local tradition of (ethnic) party patronage—have created the competing and often contradictory policies that currently govern Bosnian education. These policies include ethnically separating students into “two schools under one roof,” and adopting curricula and textbooks that favor one ethnic group over another. Because education is integral to identity formation, it stands to reason that education can therefore shape national identity as well as civic and social attitudes. Drawing from original survey data, focus groups, and interviews, I measure the attitudes of third- and fourth-year Bosnian high school students toward other ethnic groups, exploring whether or not there exists a pattern of intolerance that can be traced to school type. Although students across BiH reported largely tolerant attitudes toward other ethnic groups, patterns in the data also suggest that the notion of a codified Bosnian civic national identity is lacking. This lack of civic national identity is problematic because it means that not only is the post-war Bosnian state built upon a foundation of separateness rather than unity, but that little progress on national unity has been made in the twenty-two years since the DPA ended the war.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRaising Hope in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Youth, Education, and Peacebuilding in the Post-war Stateen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGovernment and Politicsen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledBosnia-Herzegovinaen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledConflicten_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEducationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEthnicityen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledNationalismen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledPeacebuildingen_US


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