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dc.contributor.advisorRockcastle, Garthen_US
dc.contributor.authorManongdo, Lawrenceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T06:30:40Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T06:30:40Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2319S44K
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/20263
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is about placemaking through architectural expression of Hawaiian history and culture by looking at culture, place and community, and the role they play in promoting architectural identity. Throughout the world, feasting has been and is a universal form of celebrating important events. However, the Hawaiians have evolved this great pleasure into a truly unique cultural experience. In Hawaii, this feast is called a “luau,” marking an important celebratory occasion, that is culturally rooted, festive and all about food, fun and family. A luau is more than just a gustatory event, it’s also a feast for the senses. Rooted in Hawaiian cultural values, the vision for Kaka’ako is built on empowering creativity, cultivating innovation and building a truly unique, local community by inspiring a local dialogue around food and architecture.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCULINARY IDENTITY: CULTURE, PLACE, COMMUNITYen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledAgricultureen_US


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