Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMiller, Jarrod O
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-30T18:24:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-30T18:24:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-30
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2984Q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/19224
dc.description.abstractManure is a great fertilizer for nutrient-poor soils. However, when transport costs limit utilization, alternative uses such as energy production become viable. In most cases, manure-to-energy practices produce nutrient-rich byproducts that can be used as a soil amendment. While nitrogen (N) may be lost, other nutrients like phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) are often more concentrated in these byproducts. Manure-to-energy practices include anaerobic digestion and thermal methods (pyrolysis, gasification). Composting and nutrient extraction also can alter manure and help concentrate nutrients for easier and less costly transport. All of these practices are discussed in another publication: Manure as a Natural Resource (EB-420).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Maryland Extensionen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFact Sheet;1065
dc.subjectmanure, nutrient management, alternative energy, biocharen_US
dc.titleManure to Energy Byproducts are Useful Nutrient Sourcesen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCollege of Agriculture & Natural Resourcesen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtMaryland Cooperative Extensionen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record