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Game Changers: Baseball Fans, Strikes, and Free Agency, 1966-1981

dc.contributor.advisorBland, Robert
dc.contributor.authorSiqueira Paranhos Velloso, Carolina
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-15T16:54:38Z
dc.date.available2016-02-15T16:54:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-15
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M29J0Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/17424
dc.description.abstractThis research paper examines the way in which the broader labor movement of 1970s America affected the game of baseball. In particular, I look at the impact that certain player gains - particularly free agency, implemented in 1976 - had on both the makeup of the game and on the baseball fans who were accustomed to the baseball status quo. Although it is widely assumed that fans profoundly altered their relationship with baseball when its players began making inconceivably high salaries with the advent of free agency, I argue that it was, in fact, a work stoppage five years later truly caused a long-lasting resentment of fans towards the players and team owners, because a strike of that magnitude directly affected the fans' ability to enjoy the national pastime.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectBaseball, fans, free agency, strike, MLBPAen_US
dc.titleGame Changers: Baseball Fans, Strikes, and Free Agency, 1966-1981en_US
dc.typeResearch Paperen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US


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