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dc.contributor.advisorMilke, James Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Robert E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-05T06:41:58Z
dc.date.available2015-02-05T06:41:58Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M21C8S
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/16114
dc.description.abstractAnnual direct property damage for one- and two- family residential fires is estimated as $5.9 billion in the United States. Recent research has suggested that the level of fire hazard in contemporary homes is greater than legacy homes. This study utilizes national fire incident data from 2003 to 2010 to examine trends and characteristics of residential fires. The Item First Ignited and Heat Source for fires are analyzed in a risk model. Structural Member is the Item First Ignited that contributes the greatest amount of risk in one- and two- family houses. The Heat Source for Structural Member is concentrated among three main categories: Operating Equipment, Electrical Arcing, and Hot or Smoldering Objects. Grouping together the items Upholstered Sofas, Mattresses, and Bedding as representing soft furnishings in the house, contribute the second greatest amount of risk. The main Heat Source for these items is Other Open Flame or Smoking Materialsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFire Hazard of the Contemporary American Homeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentFire Protection Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEngineeringen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledFireen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledResidentialen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRisken_US


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