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dc.contributor.authorSteinbruner, John
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-27T19:56:23Z
dc.date.available2014-10-27T19:56:23Z
dc.date.issued2010-11
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2060Q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/15974
dc.description.abstractOver the course of the 2008 election, the idea of fundamental change became the dominant theme of American politics, and to some degree the capacity to undertake it was displayed in response to a crisis of confidence in financial markets. When the flow of credit necessary to support normal economic activity virtually ceased in the final quarter of the year, prevailing ideology was abandoned and long-established policies radically altered in feats of reaction that would have been considered inconceivable just a few days before they actually occurred. The initial actions taken did not master the problem, and the process of doing so will apparently be lengthy and torturous. Nonetheless the ability to redirect policy in response to calamity was demonstrated at a moment—the final weeks of a presidential election—when it normally would have been considered least likely to occur.en_US
dc.subjectsecurity policyen_US
dc.subjectfundamental changeen_US
dc.subject2008 electionen_US
dc.subjectU.S. political systemen_US
dc.titleSecurity Policy and the Question of Fundamental Changeen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCenter for International and Security Studies at Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)


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