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D[Constructing Architecture]

dc.contributor.advisorLamprakos, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Marques Gilberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-26T05:49:59Z
dc.date.available2014-06-26T05:49:59Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/15515
dc.description.abstractCites are in a constant state of flux. The progression of time through the centuries has yielded numerous examples of entire transformations of a given city's economic, environmental, social, and cultural structures which in turn shape the physical city. In some instances those structures are allowed juxtapose themselves against each other creating a beautiful palimpsest. In other instances those layers are lost due to the changing forces of the city. As a result the narrative and the image of the city is lost. Where this is most applicable is in the context of shrinking cities. This thesis proposal will seek to explore ways in which the retention of a city's physical history and its memory can be reconciled within the context of a shrinking city. It will question, challenge and hopefully transcend current themes in historic preservation and adaptive-use taking a critical approach toward structures and systems that have lost their reason for being. The testing ground for this proposal is Detroit, Michigan.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleD[Constructing Architecture]en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledDesignen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAdaptive Reuseen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledHistoric Preservationen_US


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