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EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TANGENTIALLY-INJECTED SLOT FILM COOLING

dc.contributor.advisorTrouve, Arnauden_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarshall, Andreen_US
dc.contributor.authorVoegele, Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-05T06:31:20Z
dc.date.available2014-02-05T06:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/14815
dc.description.abstractFilm cooling is a technique used in gas turbine engines, and blades and rocket nozzles to protect critical surfaces from the hot combustion gases. In film cooling applications, a relatively cool thin fluid is injected along surfaces and subsequently mix with the hot mainstream, thus leading to a reduction of protection at the wall. The breakdown of this film involves complex physics including intense turbulent mixing, heat transfer, conduction, radiation and variable density effects to name a few. In this dissertation, film cooling is both experimentally measured and numerically simulated. The experiments feature non-intrusive Particle Image Velocimetry to provide two-dimensional planes of mean and fluctuating velocity, which are critical in order to characterize and understand the turbulent flow phenomena involved in film cooling. Additionally, through the use of micro-thermocouples, the thermal flow fields and wall temperatures are non-intrusively measured, with very small radiative errors. The film cooling flows are experimentally varied to cover a variety of breakdown regimes for both adiabatic (or idealized walls with no heat loss) and on-adiabatic walls (or walls with a carefully controlled heat loss through them). The subsequent experimental dataset is a unique and comprehensive set of turbulent measurements characterizing and demonstrating the film breakdown and the turbulent flow physics. The experiments are then numerically simulated using an in-house variable density, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code developed as part of this dissertation. In addition to accurately predicting important turbulent kinematic and thermal flow phenomena, the key wall parameters were predicted to within 3% for the adiabatic cases and to within 6% for the non-adiabatic cases, with a few exceptions. Turbulent inflow techniques, crucial for the success of LES of film cooling, are examined. In addition to the turbulent flow physics, radiation and conduction physics at the wall were also simulated with good fidelity. The combined experimental and numerical approach was used to uniquely form a comprehensive study, examining many aspects of film cooling phenomena relevant for engineering applications.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TANGENTIALLY-INJECTED SLOT FILM COOLINGen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentAerospace Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledAerospace engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledMechanical engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledCFDen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledFilm Coolingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledHeat Transferen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledLarge Eddy Simulationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledLESen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledTurbulenceen_US


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