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Heads of State, Heads of Households: Social and Political Power Relationships in Early America

dc.contributor.advisorLyons, Clare Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Mark Allenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-08T05:30:05Z
dc.date.available2011-07-08T05:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11750
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores familial and political power relationships in the American colonies after the Glorious Revolution in England in 1688 through the establishment of the independent American republic. It investigates how early American statesmen, such as Presidents and state governors, related with their families and with the public. By examining the private and public correspondence and public addresses of these characters as government leaders and heads of household, it will explain how patriarchal ideals, laws, and practices persisted and changed during the political upheaval of the American Revolution and establishment of the republic with the creation of the Constitution. It will also demonstrate how familial relationships affected people's political understandings.en_US
dc.titleHeads of State, Heads of Households: Social and Political Power Relationships in Early Americaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledHistoryen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAdamsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAmericanen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledFamilyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledJeffersonen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRevolutionen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledWashingtonen_US


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