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Less Debate, More Analysis: A Meta-Analysis of Literature on Broken Windows Policing

dc.contributor.advisorMcGloin, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDistler, Michael Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-07T05:53:28Z
dc.date.available2011-07-07T05:53:28Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11735
dc.description.abstractIn their broken windows thesis, Wilson and Kelling (1982) propose that social and physical disorder leads to a breakdown in informal social controls, thereby allowing more serious crime to occur. This framework had a tangible impact on policy, though research has shown mixed results with regard to its effectiveness. This thesis conducts a meta-analysis of 66 effect sizes, nested within eleven studies, in order to better understand the effect of broken windows policing on crime according to the literature. Results show that broken windows policing does have an effect on crime and that methodological characteristics of the studies are related to the effect. The discussion section considers the relationship between these findings and other meta-analyses on policing innovations, such as hot spots and problem-oriented policing.en_US
dc.titleLess Debate, More Analysis: A Meta-Analysis of Literature on Broken Windows Policingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCriminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCriminologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledbroken windowsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledmeta-analysisen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledpolicingen_US


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