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dc.contributor.advisorMayergoyz, Isaak Den_US
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-06T05:51:56Z
dc.date.available2011-07-06T05:51:56Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11520
dc.description.abstractTwisted-pair Ethernet is now the standard home and office last-mile network technology. For decades, the IEEE standard that defines Ethernet has required electrical isolation between the twisted pair cable and the Ethernet device. So, for decades, every Ethernet interface has used magnetic core Ethernet transformers to isolate Ethernet devices and keep users safe in the event of a potentially dangerous fault on the network media. The current state-of-the-art Ethernet transformers are miniature (<5mm diameter) ferrite-core toroids wrapped with approximately 10 to 30 turns of wire. As small as current Ethernet transformers are, they still limit further Ethernet device miniaturization and require a separate bulky package or jack housing. New coupler designs must be explored which are capable of exceptional miniaturization or on-chip fabrication. This dissertation thoroughly explores the performance of the current commercial Ethernet transformers to both increase understanding of the device's behavior and outline performance parameters for replacement devices. Lumped element and distributed circuit models are derived; testing schemes are developed and used to extract model parameters from commercial Ethernet devices. Transfer relation measurements of the commercial Ethernet transformers are compared against the model's behavior and it is found that the tuned, distributed models produce the best transfer relation match to the measured data. Process descriptions and testing results on fabricated thin-film dielectric-core toroid transformers are presented. The best results were found for a 32-turn transformer loaded with 100&#937;, the impedance of twisted pair cable. This transformer gave a flat response from about 10MHz to 40MHz with a height of approximately 0.45. For the fabricated transformer structures, theoretical methods to determine resistance, capacitance and inductance are presented. A special analytical and numerical analysis of the fabricated transformer inductance is presented. Planar cuts of magnetic slope fields around the dielectric-core toroid are shown that describe the effect of core height and winding density on flux uniformity without a magnetic core.en_US
dc.titleMODELING AND TESTING OF ETHERNET TRANSFORMERSen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledElectrical Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledElectromagneticsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolleddistributed modelingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEtherneten_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledMEMSen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRF testingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledTransformeren_US


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