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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/13097

Title: THE EFFECTS OF FUTURE GLOBAL CHANGE ON ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI AND SOIL CARBON: USING URBANIZATION AS A SURROGATE FOR FUTURE CONDITIONS IN FIELD STUDIES
Authors: Wolf, Julie
Advisors: Needelman, Brian
Department/Program: Environmental Science and Technology
Type: Dissertation
Sponsors: Digital Repository at the University of Maryland
University of Maryland (College Park, Md.)
Subjects: Soil sciences
Climate change
Ecology
Keywords: climate change
mycorrhizal fungi
ozone
soil carbon
urbanization
Issue Date: 2012
Abstract: Carbon, fixed photosynthetically by plants, cycles through plant, microbial biomass, soil, and atmospheric carbon pools. The effects of global change on this cycling will impact future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, but are poorly understood. In urban areas, temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations are often elevated to levels that simulate near-future climate changes. These elevations are not sudden, uniform step increases but are gradual and variable; as such urbanization may provide a means to simulate the effects of near-future climate changes. The dissertation research encompasses two studies utilizing urban macroclimate to study the effects of future climate change. In the first study, plots containing a common imported soil and seed bank were established at three locations along a 50 km urban-to-rural transect. In these plots, plant community development, temperature, carbon dioxide concentrations, and other factors had been monitored for five years. Subsequently, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal structures in bulk soil were quantified. These fungi receive carbon directly from plant roots, grow into bulk soil, and can transfer immobile soil minerals to their plant hosts. In contrast to expectations, fewer fungal structures were found closer to the urban side of the transect. The second study was an observational study of soil carbon in minimally managed, long-undisturbed soils located at varying distances from urban areas. In sampling sites at 62 golf courses, similar communities of cool-season grasses had been undisturbed for at least 25 years. At each site, total and active soil carbon and many potential explanatory factors were measured and examined with multiple regression analysis. Contrary to expectations, soil carbon was positively correlated with warmer February-only mean daily minimum soil temperatures, suggesting that winter temperatures are more important than mean annual temperature for soil C storage in temperate grassland. Other correlations, including positive correlations with soil cation exchange capacity, soil lead levels, and tropospheric ozone exposure during the peak ozone season, were also detected. Potential mechanisms for the detected relationships are explored. The results of both experiments demonstrate that commonly-held expectations based on single-factor global change experiments or models are not always borne out in complex natural systems.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/13097
Appears in Collections:Environmental Science & Technology Theses and Dissertations
UMD Theses and Dissertations

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