The Digital Repository at the University of Maryland (DRUM) collects, preserves, and provides public access to the scholarly output of the university. Faculty and researchers can upload research products for rapid dissemination, global visibility and impact, and long-term preservation.

You can use DRUM to share and preserve a wide range of research products, such as:

  • Articles, papers, books, and technical reports
  • Data and code
  • Supplemental material for journal articles
  • Presentations and posters
  • Theses and dissertations

To get started, review our short guide to submitting your research.

You can track views and downloads of your research, and everything in DRUM is indexed by Google and Google Scholar. You receive a permanent DOI for your items, making it easy for other researchers to cite your work.

Depositing research in DRUM can help you satisfy data management and sharing requirements from the NSF, NIH, and other funding agencies and journals.

  • CSV Validation for Metadata Wrangling 

    Westgard, Joshua A. (2015-06-04)
    This lightning talk describes a Python script for the validation of CSV files against arbitrary sets of rules specified in a schema file. The motivation for creating the tool was that CSV (comma-separated values) files ...
  • Privacy Issues and the Use of sUAS/Drones in Maryland 

    Goeringer, Paul; Ellixson, Ashley; Moyle, Jon (2015-11)
    According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the lawful use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), also known as Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or more commonly as drones, are currently limited to military, ...
  • The Evolving Scholarly Record: Scope, Stakeholders, and Stewardship 

    Lavoie, Brian (2015-11-16)
    The scholarly record is increasingly digital and networked, as well as expanding in both the volume and diversity of the material it contains. The long-term future of the scholarly record cannot be effectively secured with ...
  • E-Book Perceptions and Use in STEM and Non-STEM Disciplines: A Comparative Follow-Up Study 

    Carroll, Alexander J.; Corlett-Rivera, Kelsey; Hackman, Timothy; Zou, Jinwang (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016-01)
    This article describes the results of a survey that gathered data on perceptions and use of e-books from undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, and staff. The investigators analyzed the results based on user ...
  • Cybersecurity - What's Language got to do with it? 

    Klavans, Judith L. (2015-09-18)
    A new opportunity to explore and leverage the power of computational linguistic methods and analysis in ensuring effective Cybersecurity is presented. This White Paper discusses some of the specific emerging research ...

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