Sensory-to-Motor Overflow: Cooling Foot Soles Impedes Squat Jump Performance

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2020-10-09

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Caminita M, Garcia GL, Kwon HJ, Miller RH and Shim JK (2020) Sensory-to-Motor Overflow: Cooling Foot Soles Impedes Squat Jump Performance. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 14:549880.

Abstract

Evidence from recent studies on animals and humans suggest that neural overflow from the primary sensory cortex (S1) to the primary motor cortex (M1) may play a critical role in motor control. However, it is unclear if whole-body maximal motor tasks are also governed by this mechanism. Maximum vertical squat jumps were performed by 15 young adults before cooling, then immediately following a 15-min cooling period using an ice-water bath for the foot soles, and finally immediately following a 15-min period of natural recovery from cooling. Jump heights were, on average, 3.1 cm lower immediately following cooling compared to before cooling (p = 3.39 × 10−8) and 1.9 cm lower following natural recovery from cooling (p = 0.00124). The average vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) was also lower by 78.2 N in the condition immediately following cooling compared to before cooling (p = 8.1 × 10−5) and 56.7N lower following natural recovery from cooling (p = 0.0043). The current study supports the S1-to-M1 overflow mechanism in a whole-body dynamic jump.

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Partial funding for Open Access provided by the UMD Libraries' Open Access Publishing Fund.

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