BiDil: Race Medicine Or Race Marketing?

dc.contributor.authorSankar, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorKahn, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T14:58:51Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T14:58:51Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.description.abstractRecent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the first drug with a race-specific indication has fueled the controversy over the meaning of race and ethnicity and raised questions over whether this move should be seen as an advance or a setback in the struggle to address disparities in health status associated with race. The drug, BiDil, combines two generics long recognized as benefiting patients with heart failure, irrespective of race or ethnicity. The push to bring these drugs to market as a race-specific treatment was motivated by the peculiarities of U.S. patent law and a willingness to exploit race to gain commercial and regulatory advantage.
dc.description.urihttps://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.W5.455
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/5g5l-pcgd
dc.identifier.citationSankar, Pamela and Kahn, Jonathan (2005) BiDil: Race Medicine Or Race Marketing? Health Affairs, W5. pp. 455-463.
dc.identifier.otherEprint ID 275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/22446
dc.subjectHealth Equity
dc.subjectBioethics
dc.subjectPharmacotherapy
dc.subjectBiDil
dc.subjectrace
dc.subjectrace medicine
dc.subjectFood and Drug Administration (FDA)
dc.subjectheart failure
dc.subjectdisparities
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectblack
dc.titleBiDil: Race Medicine Or Race Marketing?
dc.typeArticle
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