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dc.contributor.authorProgram on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA)
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-25T23:27:51Z
dc.date.available2010-08-25T23:27:51Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/10653
dc.description.abstractAfter a century that saw two world wars, the Holocaust, Stalin's gulag, the killing fields of Cambodia, and more recent atrocities in Rwanda and now Darfur, the belief that we are progressing morally has become difficult to defend. Yet there is more to the question than some extreme cases of moral breakdown.en_US
dc.subjectJusticeen_US
dc.subjectHuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectGenocideen_US
dc.titleRighting Wrongs: Sixty years after the universal declaration of human rights was adopted by the UN, attitudes, at least, have change dramaticallyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)


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