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dc.contributor.advisorWeese, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAkinsade, Olumide Oseyemien_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-03T13:05:40Z
dc.date.available2005-08-03T13:05:40Z
dc.date.issued2004-09-07en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/2312
dc.description.abstractThe identity of cities were defined by gothic cathedrals in the middle ages in the same way that industrial "palaces" of the industrial age codified a sense of identity for many major cities. These infrastructure that were built on the thriving manufacture of steel, automobiles e.t.c. saw their heyday during the industrial era are now witnessing a rapid transformation in form and function within today's information driven era. How can a city or neighborhood retain its delicate ecosystem of industrial history, role, identity and function in the face of such epic global industrial transformation? . This thesis will address and solve through master planning, these issues faced within the neighborhood of Locust Point in Baltimore city. It will also seek to strengthen the community through adaptive re-use of its existing industrial buildings, the linkage of the community to the Baltimore harbor and connection to Fort McHenry, a national historic park.en_US
dc.format.extent136872473 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleBACK AND FORTH : (Re) Weaving and (Re) Knitting Locust Point IntoThe Fabric of Baltimore City.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledUrban and Regional Planningen_US


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