Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBhadurihauck, Sara
dc.contributor.authorGoeringer, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-15T13:40:43Z
dc.date.available2017-06-15T13:40:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M24G3V
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/19254
dc.description.abstractOffering a horse for lease can be a good option for an owner who is unable to ride or care for their horse due to physical, time, or financial constraints but still wishes to maintain ownership. A lease can be an alternative to selling the horse, a way to cut maintenance costs, or an avenue to ensure the horse remains in work. While some verbal contracts are considered binding in Maryland, getting the agreement in writing is a good idea. A well-written lease can protect the owner (also called the lessor) and the lessee (the person leasing the horse) from liability and ensure both parties understand their rights and responsibilities. An equine lease can take many forms, depending on how the lease agreement is constructed. Consider the following items when preparing or reviewing a written lease agreement.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Maryland Extension and the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economicsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFS;1062
dc.subjectequineen_US
dc.subjectagricultural lawen_US
dc.subjectequine lawen_US
dc.subjecthorseen_US
dc.subjectequine leaseen_US
dc.titleConsiderations for Equine Lease Agreementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCollege of Agriculture & Natural Resources
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDepartment of Agricultural & Resource Economics
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record