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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/10106

Title: The Effects of Reality vs. Fantasy Based First-Person Shooting Video Games on Adolescent Behavior
Authors: Travers, Christopher
Advisors: Southerland, Wallace III
Type: Article
Keywords: Video game
General aggression model
Adolescent
Violence
Issue Date: 2008
Citation: The University of Maryland McNair Scholars Undergraduate Research Journal, 1, no. 1 (Winter 2008): 221-235.
Abstract: This conceptual paper reviewed the literature on violent video games and aggression. Using the General Aggression Model as a framework, this study provides evidence to support the relationship between video game violence and aggressiveness. To address the lack of research on first-person shooter (FPS) video games found in the literature, a future study will be proposed observing different types of first-person shooter video games (reality and fantasy) and the effects they may have on adolescent behavior. Consistent with the General Aggression Model, findings showed increases in aggression for adolescents exposed to violent video games. While research shows first-person shooter video games increase adolescent aggressiveness, evidence on different types of first-person shooter games and their effects on adolescent behavior were inconclusive. However, research reported by Potter (1988) showed that viewers tend to experience more emotional and behavioral issues when viewing reality based media. In addition, Anderson and Bushman (2002) reported that empirical evidence shows that violent video games and aggressiveness have a positive and significant relationship. The grouping of Anderson and Bushman (2002) and Potter (1988), provide evidence that adolescent aggressiveness will be higher when playing reality based first-person shooter games in comparison to fantasy based first-person shooter video games.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/10106
Appears in Collections:McNair Scholars Undergraduate Research Journal, 2008, Vol. 1

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