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Herbivore metabolism and stoichiometry each constrain herbivory at different organizational scales across ecosystems

dc.contributor.authorHillebrand, Helmut
dc.contributor.authorBorer, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorBracken, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorCardinale, Brad
dc.contributor.authorCebrian, Just
dc.contributor.authorCleland, Elsa
dc.contributor.authorElser, James
dc.contributor.authorGruner, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorHarpole, Stanley
dc.contributor.authorNgai, Jackie
dc.contributor.authorSandin, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorSeabloom, Eric
dc.contributor.authorShurin, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Melinda
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-21T12:39:26Z
dc.date.available2009-07-21T12:39:26Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationHillebrand, H., E. T. Borer, M. E. S. Bracken, B. J. Cardinale, J. Cebrian, E. E. Cleland, J. J. Elser, D. S. Gruner, W. S. Harpole, J. T. Ngai, S. Sandin, E. W. Seabloom, J. B. Shurin, J. E. Smith, and M. D. Smith. 2009. Herbivore metabolism and stoichiometry each constrain herbivory at different organizational scales across ecosystems. Ecology Letters 12:516-527en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/9414
dc.description.abstractPlant-herbivore interactions mediate the trophic structure of ecosystems. We use a comprehensive data set extracted from the literature to test the relative explanatory power of two contrasting bodies of ecological theory, the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) and ecological stoichiometry (ES), for per-capita and population-level rates of herbivory across ecosystems. We found that ambient temperature and herbivore body size (MTE) as well as stoichiometric mismatch (ES) both constrained herbivory, but at different scales of biological organization. Herbivore body size, which varied over 11 orders of magnitude, was the primary factor explaining variation in per-capita rates of herbivory. Stoichiometric mismatch explained more variation in population-level herbivory rates and also in per-capita rates when we examined data from within functionally similar trophic groups (e.g. zooplankton). Thus, predictions from metabolic and stoichiometric theories offer complementary explanations for patterns of herbivory that operate at different scales of biological organization.en
dc.format.extent322036 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEcology Lettersen
dc.subjectbody sizeen
dc.subjectecological stoichiometryen
dc.subjectgrazingen
dc.subjectherbivoryen
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen
dc.subjectmetabolic theory of ecologyen
dc.subjectnutrient ratiosen
dc.subjecttemperatureen
dc.titleHerbivore metabolism and stoichiometry each constrain herbivory at different organizational scales across ecosystemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtEntomologyen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCollege of Chemical & Life Sciencesen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us


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