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dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Steven P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBanerji, Manjisthaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-24T06:57:03Z
dc.date.available2009-01-24T06:57:03Z
dc.date.issued2008-12-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/8809
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines if self-arranged marriages (or love marriages) have replaced parent-arranged marriages as the dominant form of marriage in India. In particular, I examine if women of recent cohorts (born around 1980) are less likely to report arranged marriages than women of older cohorts (born around 1956). I also examine if educated women are less likely to report arranged marriages than their less educated counterparts. Results from multinomial regression analysis suggest that women of recent cohorts are more likely to report a parent arranged marriages with their consent. Education is associated with greater autonomy in partner choice decision but it is most strongly associated with parent arranged marriages with consent. I conclude that in a context where a dating culture is not normative, parent arranged marriages with consent may be the best way to accommodate individual choice while retaining some of the traditional parental control over spouse choice.en_US
dc.format.extent166024 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleIs Education associated with a Transition towards Autonomy in Partner Choice? A Case Study of Indiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledSociology, Demographyen_US


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