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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Barry Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Thomas Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-20T05:31:49Z
dc.date.available2008-06-20T05:31:49Z
dc.date.issued2008-03-06en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/8047
dc.description.abstractNicotine, caffeine, impulsivity, and arousal are all intercorrelated: both drugs increase arousal, and impulsivity is theoretically related to arousal. However, the independent and joint effects of nicotine and caffeine on impulsive behavior are unclear. In this study, male college students (N = 63) were administered either caffeine or lactose placebo (double-blind) and either nicotine or placebo cigarettes (double-blind). Participants engaged in three behavioral tasks: the Stop Signal Task (SST), the Stroop Color-Word Test (SCWT), and the Delay Discounting Task (DDT). Drug intake did not produce significant changes across conditions on any of the three tasks. The hypothesis that caffeine and nicotine have an interactive effect on impulsivity in men was not supported by the data. Potential reasons for the lack of significant findings include variability within the sample on consumption history.en_US
dc.format.extent880427 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleArousal theory and the interrelationships of caffeine, nicotine and impulsivityen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPsychology, Experimentalen_US


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