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dc.contributor.advisorOster, Rose-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-22T05:37:32Z
dc.date.available2007-06-22T05:37:32Z
dc.date.issued2007-05-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/6925
dc.description.abstractThis thesis seeks to illustrate that runes were considered magical even if also utilized as an alphabetic script. This argument will be achieved by first looking at scholarly arguments concerning the characters' origins. However, though runes may be compared to other scripts, there existed a belief among the Old Norse people that the runes contained more and that even their true origins could be found in the divine. These divine connections are not without problems as they seem to fall into two categories involving male and female divinities. In addition, it will be shown that the practice of runic magic can be separated into three major categories: curse, cure/protection, and prophecy. More mundane, but equally important subjects such as memorials and inheritance will also be explored. Finally, lingering traces of runes continuing until today will be viewed to gauge lasting effects of the runes even after their primary time period.en_US
dc.format.extent309527 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleRunic Magicen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentGermanic Language and Literatureen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledLiterature, Germanicen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRunic Magicen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRunesen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledRunologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledVikingsen_US


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