Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGowen, Bradforden_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Yong Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-02-04T07:12:17Z
dc.date.available2006-02-04T07:12:17Z
dc.date.issued2005-12-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/3147
dc.description.abstractIn the middle of the 19th century, many composers living outside of mainstream musical countries such as Germany and France attempted to establish their own musical identity. A typical way of distinguishing themselves from German, French, and Italian composers was to employ the use of folk elements from their native lands. This resulted in a vast amount of piano literature that was rich in national idioms derived from folk traditions. The repertoire reflected many different national styles and trends. Due to the many beautiful, brilliant, virtuosic, and profound ideas that composers infused into these nationalistic works, they took their rightful place in the standard piano repertoire. Depending on the compositional background or style of the individual composers, folk elements were presented in a wide variety of ways. For example, Bartók recorded many short examples collected from the Hungarian countryside and used these melodies to influence his compositional style. Many composers enhanced and expanded piano technique. Liszt, in his Hungarian Rhapsodies, emphasized rhythmic vitality and virtuosic technique in extracting the essence of Hungarian folk themes. Chopin and Szymanowski also made use of rhythmic figurations in their polonaises and mazurkas, often making use of double-dotted rhythms. Obviously, composers made use of nationalistic elements to add to the piano literature and to expand the technique of the piano. This dissertation comprises three piano recitals presenting works of: Isaac Albeniz, Bela Bartók, Frédéric Chopin, Enrique Granados, Edvard Grieg, Franz Liszt, Frederic Rzewski, Alexander Scriabin, Karol Szymanowski, and Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky. The recitals were performed in the Gildenhorn Recital Hall at the University of Maryland. They were recorded in 2002-2004 and are available on line through the website of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center of the University of Maryland.en_US
dc.format.extent880440 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleNATIONAL CHARACTER AS EXPRESSED IN PIANO LITERATUREen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMusicen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledMusicen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledNationalismen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledpiano literatureen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledGermanen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledFrenchen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledand Italian composersen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record