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THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT REGIMES ON TIME-BASED DEFENSE INNOVATION

dc.contributor.advisorJoyce, Philip Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreenwalt, William Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-07T05:37:50Z
dc.date.available2021-07-07T05:37:50Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/jcvv-fbtx
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/27248
dc.description.abstractTime was a significant factor in shaping disruptive defense innovation solutions in World War II and the early Cold War. During this period, significant advances were made in military aircraft, missiles, submarines, electronics, and other technologies that were achieved through a time-based development approach of rapid experimentation and operational prototyping. Since the 1960s, however, the time taken to develop and deploy U.S. military systems has significantly increased. This increase corresponded to a shift in emphasis within the public management regimes established to govern defense innovation to one of predominately controlling cost. A systems analysis approach to defense management gained prominence during the Kennedy Administration and emphasized cost analysis, program budgeting, and centralized planning and control from within the Office of the Secretary of Defense as a means to obtain greater efficiency in defense spending. This framework was implemented through a series of linear processes overseen by compartmented management regimes such as the requirements, budget, acquisition, and contracting functions in a structure institutionalized in law and regulation. These linear processes evolved in a way that increased the minimum time to conduct defense innovation that far exceeded previous developmental timelines. Compounding the problem of linearity, government-unique processes and requirements within defense management regimes have created barriers to the civil-military integration of the industrial base. This has furthered the establishment of a narrow, specialized defense industrial base by excluding from the defense market those commercial companies that innovate quickly within time-based constraints. While periodic end-rounds to management regimes were created when the Department needed to rapidly innovate in an emergency or to access innovation from the larger commercial market, these efforts have been at the margins of expenditures and were eventually constrained by the traditional management regimes. A broader ability to reduce innovation times or expand the defense industrial base will require systematic change to address process linearity and civil-military integration barriers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT REGIMES ON TIME-BASED DEFENSE INNOVATIONen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPublic Policyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPublic policyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledCivil Military Integrationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledDefenseen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledDefense Acquisitionen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledDefense Budgeten_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledInnovationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledPublic Managementen_US


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