Regionalism and Universality on the Big Muddy: A Trail of Pavilions along the Mississippi River

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2005-05-23
Authors
Herzberg, Matthew Evan
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Kelly, Brian P
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Abstract
For over 2,500 miles, the Mississippi passes through distinct regions, each with unique climatic, cultural, geologic, and ecological traits. This thesis proposes a trail of pavilions along the full length of the Mississippi to encourage exploration of the river's diverse settings and cultures. A concept of regional and universal design will govern the form of each pavilion, the degree to which the pavilions resemble one another, and their environmental sustainability. The Mississippi River plays an important role in American notions of Manifest Destiny. Its landscape and river towns are representative of American, rather than Eurocentric, typologies. However, as populations continue to migrate towards Sun Belt and Western cities and suburbs, and as commerce and shipping on the river face increasing competition from other modes, these towns face the prospect of becoming irrelevant. This network of pavilions proposes one way to reconnect these towns to the river and each other.
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