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What If We Were Equal? A Comparison Of The Black-White Mortality Gap In 1960 And 2000

dc.contributor.authorSatcher, David
dc.contributor.authorFryer, George E., Jr.
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorTroutman, Adewale
dc.contributor.authorWoolf, Steven H.
dc.contributor.authorRust, George
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14T15:01:51Z
dc.date.available2019-08-14T15:01:51Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/um1d-nlzv
dc.identifier.citationSatcher, David and Fryer, George E., Jr. and McCann, Jessica and Troutman, Adewale and Woolf, Steven H. and Rust, George (2005) What If We Were Equal? A Comparison Of The Black-White Mortality Gap In 1960 And 2000. Health Affairs, 24 (2). pp. 459-464.
dc.identifier.otherEprint ID 1173
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/23094
dc.description.abstractThe United States has made progress in decreasing the black-white gap in civil rights, housing, education, and income since 1960, but health inequalities persist. We examined trends in black-white standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for each age-sex group from 1960 to 2000. The black-white gap measured by SMR changed very little between 1960 and 2000 and actually worsened for infants and for African American men age thirty-five and older. In contrast, SMR improved in African American women. Using 2002 data, an estimated 83,570 excess deaths each year could be prevented in the United States if this black-white mortality gap could be eliminated.
dc.description.urihttps://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.24.2.459
dc.subjectHealth Equity
dc.subjectblack-white gap
dc.subjecthealth inequalities
dc.subjectblack-white standardized mortality ratios
dc.titleWhat If We Were Equal? A Comparison Of The Black-White Mortality Gap In 1960 And 2000
dc.typeArticle


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